OMIA 001691-9615 : Recombination rate in Canis lupus familiaris

In other species: mallard , domestic cat , horse , cattle , goat , sheep

Possibly relevant human trait(s) and/or gene(s) (MIM number): 612042

Mendelian trait/disorder: yes

Considered a defect: no

Key variant known: no

Molecular basis: Axelsson et al. (2012) provided evidence that the canine lineage has lost the gene PRDM9, which in other lineages plays a central role in initiating recombination, creating recombination "hotspots". Lacking this gene, the canine lineage has a "greater evolutionary stability of recombination hotspots".

Campbell et al. (2016) concluded that despite lacking PRDM9, "dogs have similar broad scale properties of recombination to humans, while fine-scale recombination is similar to other species lacking PRDM9."

References


Note: the references are listed in reverse chronological order (from the most recent year to the earliest year), and alphabetically by first author within a year.
2016 Campbell, C.L., Bhérer, C., Morrow, B.E., Boyko, A.R., Auton, A. :
A Pedigree-Based Map of Recombination in the Domestic Dog Genome. G3 (Bethesda) :, 2016. Pubmed reference: 27591755. DOI: 10.1534/g3.116.034678.
2013 Auton, A., Rui Li, Y., Kidd, J., Oliveira, K., Nadel, J., Holloway, J.K., Hayward, J.J., Cohen, P.E., Greally, J.M., Wang, J., Bustamante, C.D., Boyko, A.R. :
Genetic Recombination Is Targeted towards Gene Promoter Regions in Dogs. PLoS Genet 9:e1003984, 2013. Pubmed reference: 24348265. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003984.
2012 Axelsson, E., Webster, M.T., Ratnakumar, A. :
Death of PRDM9 coincides with stabilization of the recombination landscape in the dog genome. Genome Res 22:51-63, 2012. Pubmed reference: 22006216. DOI: 10.1101/gr.124123.111.

Edit History


  • Created by Frank Nicholas on 08 Jun 2012
  • Changed by Frank Nicholas on 05 Aug 2013
  • Changed by Frank Nicholas on 04 Sep 2016